National Food Day

Every October 24 (this Friday), Food Day brings together eaters, chefs, farmers, families, local food advocates, food policymakers, and many more around the country in celebration of real food, food and farmworker justice, and healthy diets. All 50 states host events from cooking demonstrations and taste tests to panel discussions and child education. There is undoubtedly something going on in your area – find an event using this map on the Food Day website.

According to the Food Day team, some of the top 5 ways to “Eat Real” on a budget are to:

  • buy in bulk (we offer bulk buying of apples and veggies)
  • eat seasonally (our specialty…)
  • cook your own meals (what else can you do with 40 lbs of roots?) –> I must amend this 🙂 Shared Harvest shares are a wonderful and balanced combination of fresh greens, squash, root vegetables, alliums, and other things….

What an appropriate way to kick off the Shared Harvest season. We like to share the real and whole foods being grown around us, as well as the fun of cooking fall and winter meals and storing produce in our homes, saving both of us trips back and forth.

Among all of the other resources, fact sheets and infographics created by the Food Day team for bloggers and others to share, I am most excited by their recommended readings. It’s time to put together your winter reading list…here are a few that have made mine:

Behind the Kitchen Door  by Jayaraman Sarumathi

The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People, and Communities by Will Allen and Charles Wilson

Bringing It To The Table: On Farming and Food by Wendell Berry

The full list is here. Lots of great children’s books listed!

Our first distribution is this Saturday….are you signed up?

 

 

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One Response to National Food Day

  1. janemhammer says:

    Just a note on the third recommendation: you won’t get all roots in your share! It’s more like 20 pounds of roots, plus squash, greens, onions, etc. And, if you have roots that you don’t know what to do with or you want a counterpoint to the traditional stews, try fermenting!! Lacto-fermentation recipes are found on their own page under the “Storage Tips and Recipes” menu, and it works well for almost any root, except perhaps potatoes.

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