National Food Day

Every October 24 (this Friday), Food Day brings together eaters, chefs, farmers, families, local food advocates, food policymakers, and many more around the country in celebration of real food, food and farmworker justice, and healthy diets. All 50 states host events from cooking demonstrations and taste tests to panel discussions and child education. There is undoubtedly something going on in your area – find an event using this map on the Food Day website.

According to the Food Day team, some of the top 5 ways to “Eat Real” on a budget are to:

  • buy in bulk (we offer bulk buying of apples and veggies)
  • eat seasonally (our specialty…)
  • cook your own meals (what else can you do with 40 lbs of roots?) –> I must amend this ūüôā Shared Harvest shares are a wonderful and balanced combination of fresh greens, squash, root vegetables, alliums, and other things….

What an appropriate way to kick off the Shared Harvest season. We like to share the real and whole foods being grown around us, as well as the fun of cooking fall and winter meals and storing produce in our homes, saving both of us trips back and forth.

Among all of the other resources, fact sheets and infographics created by the Food Day team for bloggers and others to share, I am most excited by their recommended readings. It’s time to put together your winter reading list…here are a few that have made mine:

Behind the Kitchen Door  by Jayaraman Sarumathi

The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People, and Communities by Will Allen and Charles Wilson

Bringing It To The Table: On Farming and Food by Wendell Berry

The full list is here. Lots of great children’s books listed!

Our first distribution is this Saturday….are you signed up?

 

 

Apples, from Glenn’s home to yours

APPLES, part of your November share, come to you from the orchards of Cider Hill Farm in Amesbury. Open until Christmas this year, Cider Hill is worth a visit Рfun for everyone, with hayrides, pumpkins big and small, endless cider doughnuts, and of course, several varieties of apples to taste and pick.

On Friday, when it was fairly cloudy and cool in Boston, some Shared Harvest team members took a trip up to Cider Hill, where the sun was shining and a morning spent under apple trees was really our only option.

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The crew minus Jane, weighed down with apples (or not)

After a walk through the corn maze, ample apple picking, donut eating and checking out the animals and experimental hydroponic system, we were pretty spent. On our way out, we were lucky to snag a few moments with Glenn Cook, owner of Cider Hill (along with his wife Karen Cook). Like our other producers, Cider Hill is a small family operation and we love knowing that the orchards and fields have been managed by the same family for almost 40 years. Glenn, all smiles and high energy, is happy to send us apples for our core share, and additional/optional bulk and cider apples, just in time for Thanksgiving and the rest of the hectic holiday season.

Even though most of my apples are being unconsciously snacked on with peanut butter, I can’t wait to put my apples into slaws and sauce (Gala apples make fantastic applesauce). Hopefully, I have enough apples to tide me over until Shared Harvest begins. If not…I’ll have to go back. And while I’m there, I might as well get a few donuts.

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A perfect fall day

 

 

Boston Local Food Festival: Thanks for coming out!

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A week after the fifth annual (but Shared Harvest’s¬†first)¬†Boston Local Food Festival, we have just about recovered from all of the madness: a chilly early set-up, doling out hundreds of samples of fresh Picadilly Farm sweet peppers and carrots with Crystal Brook Farm goat cheese, and having great conversations with all of the curious locavores¬† in the Boston area (and many from away!). If you have found our website since, or because of, the Festival…we look forward to feeding you this winter!

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Above: Elsbeth and Jane hold down the CSA explanations, while two sweet potatoes discreetly hold down our banner in windy downtown Boston. It takes some thought to explain, efficiently, what Shared Harvest is and does. But once folks understand our winter share program, it is rewarding to keep a lively conversation going amidst thousands of people and free food samples.

Sign up for your two, three, four or five month share today, and rest easy knowing that you will be eating locally into the winter and connecting with a new community.

If you missed the festival, or want to be reminded of the bounty to come, find us next at the Fall + Winter Farm Share Fair, hosted by Belmont Food Collaborative. Thursday, October 16, 5:30-7:30pm at the Watertown Public Library (123 Main St in Watertown).