Menu for this week 1/25/14 from Jackie Starr

Jacqui Starr’s Shared Harvest Menu!

Dinner ideas for week 1/25/2014

SATURDAY

butternut squash lasagna, sauteed kale, salad

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Butternut-Squash-and-Hazelnut-Lasagne-105911

Have made this many times. Squash and bechamel can be prepared ahead (I suggest not mixing in the hazelnuts ahead of time, as they get soggy). Or whole thing can be made ahead and reheated.

SUNDAY

(Dinner planned for previous Friday and never made)

Sauteed cabbage with sesame seeds (soy sauce, sesame oil, mirin, garlic, ginger), peanut sauce, soba noodles

MONDAY

Soup: Can’t decide among green pea soup, or avogolemono soup (plain, or with escarole as per Melissa Bittman, or with frozen green peas), butternut squash soup with roasted red peppers, or borscht – which would use many of our winter vegetables in one pot.

http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/green-pea-soup-recipe.html

http://www.nytimes.com/recipes/1015970/lemony-egg-soup-with-escarole.html

See below for a collection of borscht recipes


TUESDAY

Cod cakes or other simply cooked fish

celery root salad with anchovies & capers (from The Silver Spoon, link below; see also note from Jackie about using anchovies for a nice umami flavor*) 

http://www.thehungrygannet.co.uk/foodblog/celeriac-carpaccio-or-is-it/

roasted vegetables if you like, or another salad

WEDNESDAY

some sort of Asian/Chinese glazed turnips, maybe miso-glazed, sweet ginger tofu, rice or quinoa

tofu: http://ediblemontereybay.com/category/recipes/page/8/

turnips possibly one of these:

http://ediblemadison.com/recipes/view/ginger-orange-glazed-turnips

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/honey-soy-glazed-vegetables-with-crispy-mushrooms

http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/miso-honey-glazed-turnips.aspx

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Japanese-Turnips-with-Miso-354957

 

THURSDAY

Potato pizza, with goat cheese, plus/minus pesto, e.g.:

http://www.greenkitchenstories.com/potato-pizza/

 

FRIDAY

pasta primavera (onion, kohlrabi, mushrooms, carrots)

I like to saute my mushrooms and brown and caramelize them nicely, and serve them on top of a thick simple tomato sauce. Don’t rush the sauteeing of the vegetables, and make sure to season them with salt and pepper. To me this makes a big difference over pasta primavera that can sometimes taste like a watery, homogenous, vegetable mush. I haven’t yet browned kohlrabi – would do that or steam them and add separately, however, if browning them in pan I suggest doing so separately from mushrooms. This would also be good on a whole grain instead of pasta.

 

As an alternative: Melissa Clark’s column this week has a delicious looking parsnip pasta:

http://www.nytimes.com/video/dining/100000002669617/pasta-with-parsnips-and-bacon.html

 

BORSCHT RECIPES:


vegetarian, with porcini  mushrooms, the kitchn, not such a beety taste
http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-borscht-48181

vegetarian with cabbage and potatoes
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/russian-cabbage-borscht/

with meat:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Borscht-105960

vegetarian:
https://food52.com/recipes/3327-dr-zhivago-borscht

with fennel, potato, cabbage, sausage
https://food52.com/recipes/20253-karelian-borscht

with meat but can omit:
https://food52.com/recipes/21085-hearty-winter-borscht

(Jane’s Note on Borscht, “I got the idea from a shareholder who moved to VT, Matt Bastress, to use fermented beets and/or cabbage (sauerkraut) added in at the end of the borscht making–adds a delicious tang and some freshness and sort of rounds out the flavor, a bit like garnishing with sour cream.  Yum!”)

*Notes on using Anchovies from Jackie:

For people who are not vegan or vegetarian anchovies are a total superfood and add “umami” flavor. That particular cookbook has tons of ways to use them on various vegetables, often just a variation on an anchovy vinaigrette of some sort on warm or cold vegetables. (Below is description from someone else’s blog). Anyone who likes Caesar salad dressing would probably like these dressings, and one can increase or reduce the proportion of anchovies depending on the degree of love-hate for them. Used in moderation they don’t impart a fishy flavor, more just a depth and intensity of flavor.

I can look up the proportions if anyone is interested — it’s a nice variation on my usual marinade for beets (sherry vinegar and olive oil) and the umami taste would complement any dinner that otherwise has lots of other roots involved.

There is a classic Italian combination with cauliflower, anchovies, garlic, crushed red pepper, toasted pine nuts — on pasta or alone. I bet it would be delicious to do kohlrabi this way — maybe I’ll try it and put it on a weekly menu sometime if it works.

Beet salad with anchovies
http://tasty-magazine.blogspot.com/2011/12/silver-spoon-part-2.html
“This above picture is beets with anchovies.  It is a very simple recipe which has you cooking the beets then dicing them up.  Next you take a can of anchovies and after rinsing them, you place them in a hot pan with some extra virgin olive oil and some red wine vinegar.  You stir them around for what seemed like 2 minutes as they completely disintegrated.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s