Farm shares for the summer and spring discount on winter shares for 2014

Shared Harvest CSA is a winter farm share, which has pickups once/month from late October through February, in Arlington, Canton, JP, Hingham, and Buzzards Bay.  You can sign up now, which best helps the farmers (they are planning, buying supplies, and seeding already for those fall crops) and gives you a discount, and the share pickups begin in the fall.

The excellent farms who collaborate for the Shared Harvest winter share each have their own summer shares, delivered to or located in this area.  Sign up directly with them.
Picadillyfarm.com (certified organic box shares–Arlington, Belmont, Bedford, Watertown, Newton, North Reading)
Riverlandfarm.com (certified organic box shares–Hingham, Cohasset, Scituate, and Marshfield)

Moraine Farm in Beverly

First Root Farm in Concord
Lexington Community Farm-shares are sold out, but visit the farm stand Wed.-Sat. starting April 19.
Wright-Locke Farm in Winchester
Bay End Farm in Buzzards Bay

If you’d like to sign up for the Shared Harvest winter share, and get the early season discount, you can pay in installments (just a $90 deposit now) if that is helpful.

Click here for Online Signup for Fall/winter 2014-15

Details:

Extended Season Share

Pickups happen one Saturday each month (see sidebar for this year’s pickup dates for your location).  Choose either a 2-month or 3-month option.

Early Signup Discount will show up on the checkout page:  $20 off of a 2-month share, $30 off the 3-month share.  Your spring signup gives the farmers peace of mind.  Thank you!

3 month share (late Oct-Dec) $270.00 ($240 if signup by May 15)
2 month share (Nov-Dec) $180.00 ($160 if signup by May 15)

Deep Winter share (Jan-Feb) $180 ($160 if signup by May 15)

The Deep Winter share works well for people who have more limited storage (and thus can’t stock up in the fall) and for those looking for fresh greens in the later winter months.  Planned share contents:  dried beans, a variety of root vegetables, butternut squash, onions, garlic, popcorn, tomato puree, spinach, claytonia salad greens, other greens depending upon weather/greenhouse conditions.

The spring discount will show up on the checkout page.  Your spring signup gives the farmers peace of mind.  Thank you!

 

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Something good about snow…

Sanford Kelley's wild Maine blueberry field, Mason Bay, Jonesport, Maine

wild blueberry field this winter in Jonesport, Maine

This post could also be titled:  CSA and buying direct from local farms = a sweet deal for farmers and eaters!

But stay tuned for a reason to be thankful we had all that snow…as well as being thankful it’s over!

Blueberry grower, Sanford, raking fresh wild Maine blueberries

hand harvesting blueberries for fresh sales

Many of our shareholders enjoyed getting frozen wild blueberries as an optional Extra at our Deep Winter Share pickups this January and February.  This is thanks to the work of Lynn Thurston of Blue Sky Produce.  To farm stands and fresh produce markets in our area during the late summer, Lynn delivers fresh wild blueberries direct from farmers in Maine, whom she pays a great price (about 6 times what they get from a big distributor like Wyman’s).  We get really great blueberries because Lynn works with the growers to ensure the highest quality in harvest and post-harvest handling.  In the winter, and through till April, she delivers the blueberries frozen (but with the “bloom” still on, just as if you had picked and frozen them yourself!).  Lynn is a real pleasure to work with–I always welcome our brief visits as she cheerfully drops off our order in her outfitted van and goes on to produce markets  and her other accounts in the area.  This year, the Maine blueberry harvest was lower and she found many Nova Scotia pesticide-free wild blueberry growers who also needed help getting their blueberries sold at a fair price. So, we’ve been getting boxes (4.4 pound boxes) of Nova Scblueberry boxotia blueberries this winter.  At $22/box, these are a wonderful deal.  Our family has really appreciated having a steady supply of these nutritious colorful berries with our breakfasts all winter.

In her recent newsletter, Lynn describes how good snow cover protects perennial food plants like blueberries from a bitter winter like this one.

Here is more about Lynn in her own words.  You can visit her website, too, to learn more about the Maine growers.  And look for Blue Sky blueberries in local farm stands and CSAs near you.

Lynn Thurston, Owner, Blue Sky Produce of Maine

I never set out to be produce whollynnesaler. I wanted to work outside and work for myself. Farming!! That’s it! What a good idea! Well, maybe………

I didn’t grow up on a farm and I had a lot to learn. So after getting a taste of the produce business working at Frieda’s Specialty  Produce in Los Angeles, I returned to my native “Great State of Maine” and started farming. However, I needed a job to support my farming venture, so I started brokering herbs and wholesaling fiddleheads.

I enjoyed most aspects of farming (except for fixing the equipment) and grew 5-10 acres of specialty produce such as flowering kale, napa cabbage and bok choy.  Unfortunately,after 15 years, I had to quit because of back problems. The experience taught me how hard it is to make a living farming and I resolved to try to help other small farmers.

Meanwhile, I was always disappointed I couldn’t buy Maine Wild Blueberries at the local store.  Less than 1% of wild blueberries are harvested for the fresh market because of the extra care it takes to rake and clean them.   It has taken a few years to build relationships with growers, develop packaging and learn proper postharvest handling procedures.  We now pick up wild blueberries from 8 different growers and distribute them to retail chains and farm stands. We hope you find some near you!

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Seeding Starts Today at Picadilly!

Seeding Starts Today at Picadilly!

Soon it will look like this. Think Spring and higher nighttime temps to keep the babies going.

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Partner with a Local Farm!

Shared Harvest CSA is a winter farm share, which has pickups once/month from late October through February, in Arlington, Canton, JP, Hingham, and Buzzards Bay.  You can sign up now, which best helps the farmers (they are planning, buying supplies, and seeding already for those fall crops) and gives you a discount, and the share pickups begin in the fall.

The excellent farms who collaborate for the Shared Harvest winter share each have their own summer shares, delivered to or located in this area.  Sign up directly with them.
Picadillyfarm.com (certified organic box shares–Arlington, Belmont, Bedford, Watertown, Newton, North Reading)
Riverlandfarm.com (certified organic box shares–Hingham, Cohasset, Scituate, and Marshfield)

Moraine Farm in Beverly

First Root Farm in Concord
Lexington Community Farm-shares are sold out, but visit the farm stand Wed.-Sat. starting April 19.
Wright-Locke Farm in Winchester
Bay End Farm in Buzzards Bay

If you’d like to sign up for the Shared Harvest winter share, and get the early season discount, you can pay in installments (just a $90 deposit now) if that is helpful.

Click here for Online Signup for Fall/winter 2014-15

Details:

Sign up by May 15 to get the early bird discount.

Extended Season Share

Pickups happen one Saturday each month (see sidebar for this year’s pickup dates for your location).  Choose either a 2-month or 3-month option.

Early Signup Discount will show up on the checkout page:  $20 off of a 2-month share, $30 off the 3-month share.  Your spring signup gives the farmers peace of mind.  Thank you!

3 month share (late Oct-Dec) ($270.00)
2 month share (Nov-Dec) ($180.00)
Deep Winter share

January and February.  This type of share works well for people who have more limited storage (and thus can’t stock up in the fall) and for those looking for fresh greens in the later winter months.  Planned share contents:  dried beans, a variety of root vegetables, butternut squash, onions, garlic, popcorn, tomato puree, spinach, claytonia salad greens, other greens depending upon weather/greenhouse conditions.

The $20 discount will show up on the checkout page.  Your spring signup gives the farmers peace of mind.  Thank you!

Jan/Feb ($180.00)

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Root Veggies head to the border, then overseas…

Thanks to our guide, Jackie Starr…departures and also returns to good ol’ NE comfort foods.

Shared Harvest Menu week of Feb. 2 from Jackie Starr

Looking ahead to our last pickup on February 8…below is what will most likely be in the share box, plus storage tips.

Share Contents for Deep Winter Pickup, Saturday, Feb. 8:

Use or process these within a week (keeps longer if fridge is cold, near 32 degrees):
Spinach bag, can be blanched and frozen for later use.

These will keep for many weeks in cold storage (keep moist in bag, with some ventilation, not tightly sealed):

1 Red cabbage

6# Carrots

5# Potatoes

3# Beets

2 Celeriac

2 Gilfeather

3# Parsnips

2 Kohlrabi

2# Purple Top Turnips

These will keep for many weeks in cool, dry conditions (40-55 degrees), like a shelf in your basement or unheated room as long as it doesn’t freeze:

2 Butternut

1/2# Garlic

These will keep for a year or more in dry conditions (closed jar), not too warm:

1 Jar Tomato Puree

1# bag of beans (black, pinto, or cannelini)

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Menu for this week and looking ahead to next share

glazedturnips-page

Ginger and Orange Glazed Turnips

This week’s menu featuring deep winter share veggies:

http://sharedharvestcsa.com/menu-for-this-…m-jackie-starr/

Looking ahead to our last pickup on February 8…below is what will likely be in the share box, plus storage tips.  If you’d like to order any bulk veggies to last the rest of the winter (yes, I’m afraid there will be several more weeks, at least…), check out the Extras store.

Share Contents for Deep Winter Pickup, Saturday, Feb. 8:

Use or process these within a week (keeps longer if fridge is cold, near 32 degrees):
Spinach bag, can be blanched and frozen for later use.

These will keep for many weeks in cold storage (keep moist in bag, with some ventilation, not tightly sealed):

1 Red cabbage

6# Carrots

5# Potatoes

3# Beets

2 Celeriac

2 Gilfeather

3# Parsnips

2 Kohlrabi

2# Purple Top Turnips

These will keep for many weeks in cool, dry conditions (40-55 degrees), like a shelf in your basement or unheated room as long as it doesn’t freeze:

2 Butternut

1/2# Garlic

These will keep for a year or more in dry conditions (closed jar), not too warm:

1 Jar Tomato Puree

1# bag of beans (black, pinto, or cannelini)

 

 

 

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Menu of the week from Jackie Starr

I’m curious about the beet burgers and turnip fries!

turnip fries

jackie’s menu for week of Jan. 19, 2014

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First deep winter share pickup–spring weather and a bit of summer in the box

Our first ever deep winter share pickup yesterday went off pretty well for the most part–it’s easier to keep things running smoothly when your brain and fingers aren’t frozen, of course!  Coupled with the spring weather, we also got a waft of summer time in the box with Riverland’s  tomato puree (canned in jars)–yum!  Unfortunately, the farmers at Riverland (Rob and crew, including Andrew which some of you met giving you your shares at the Winchester pickup site) were in DEEP winter freeze as they were harvesting, cleaning, and packing this week.  They learned a lot from the experience, for instance at such frigid temps, the hydraulics on the tractor forklift and the wash water system might not work as they usually do.  So, things took quite a bit longer and the spinach harvest had to happen after the boxes were packed because they had to wait for the spinach (in the low tunnels, which are warmer than the outside temps.) to thaw first. Upside for us is that the spinach is sweet and incredibly fresh!  See more about the week at Riverland…

So, even more gratitude as we enjoy our meals in our warm kitchens this month : )

Also a big thank you to Wright-Locke Farm for hosting our Winchester pickup site–it was so pleasant to have some sheltered space to set up in, the beautiful historic farm setting, and happy chickens right next door.  Thanks, too, for Winchester pickup shareholders’ patience in finding the location and creative, careful parking at the farm, and, JP pickup site folks for your part in the swift pickup in the windy rain.

Here are some storage and use guidelines for your share contents.  Enjoy a new sample menu plan for the week using share veggies thanks to Jackie Starr; also check the recipes page for more ideas.

Share contents for Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014:

Use or process these within a week (keeps longer if fridge is cold, near 32 degrees):
Spinach bag, can be blanched and frozen for later use.

These will keep for many weeks in cold storage (keep moist in bag, with some ventilation, not tightly sealed):
Carrots – 8#,
Potatoes – 5#,
Beets – 3#,
Kohlrabi—peel and slice or grate as an excellent salad or stirfry ingredient
Cabbage—if you are making sauerkraut or kimchi, do that asap
Celeriac–mildly celery flavored root great for mashing with potatoes, roasting, or for soups and stews.  Peel and cut up.
Parsnips–
excellent for stews and soups, nicely pairs with curry flavors and ginger, also see Jacqui Starr’s idea for parsnip muffins!  For the larger ones, you may want to remove the woody core and use that for making stocks (or just compost)

Turnipspurple top and scarlet beauty–great for soups, stews, crudite, and also fermenting/pickling (grate and salt ferment per the recipe in our recipes Menu “Fermentation for Taste and Preservation”)

These will keep for many weeks in cool, dry conditions (40-55 degrees), like a shelf in your basement or unheated room as long as it doesn’t freeze:
Garlic ½ #(can also be stored in a tightly closed jar in the refrigerator)
Butternut Squash–can store in your kitchen for a few weeks, cooler temps with ventilation for longer (not in a plastic bag), store in single layers/separate, not in pile.  Any with blemishes should be used right away or peel, chop and freeze.

Popcorn–once it is good for popping, remove kernels and put in sealed jar so they don’t get too dried out.

These will keep for a year or more in dry conditions (closed jar), not too warm:
Dried beans 2# –your choice of black turtle, light red kidney, or Great Northern (all organically grown)

Tomato Puree–canned in jars, organic summer tomatoes from Riverland.  These are shelf stable on your pantry shelf.

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Swap Box inspiration; Recipe ideas for this week’s share

I always get a bulk supply of some evidently less popular or less-known veggie when it appears in quantity in the swap box.  This week, guess which vegetable dominated the swap box?   While you are guessing, I’ll tell you that I’m going to peel it’s uniquely dark-colored rind to reveal it’s silky white flesh, which I will grate in my food processor, mix with salt, and let ferment into a luxurious and super easy-to-use condiment.  After a week sitting on my kitchen counter, it will be the perfect partner for tangy cheddar cheese or topping for a rich stew or roast meat.   See our Fermentation for Taste and Nutrition page under the Storage Tips and Recipes Menu. 

 

Have you guessed?  See the bottom of the page for the swap box come-from-behind champion in my kitchen!

Liza Marzilli posted this on our Facebook page–and she also blogged about what she did with much of last Saturday’s share box veggies:  http://dolcevitaverde.wordpress.com/category/csa/

Just found this recipe when looking for some new ideas and it combines so many vegetables from our recent share pick up so I wanted to share it http://www.thecurvycarrot.com/2010/11/29/warm-winter-vegetable-salad/
warm winter vegetable salad

black radish

 

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Share Pickup in Arlington tomorrow

Please share your recipes and ideas using this month’s share!

Share contents for Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013:

Use or process these within a week:
Spinach bag, can be blanched and frozen for later use.
Kale—2 bunches or 1 kale and 1 collard—great sauted, in soups, ribboned or chopped and marinated for a salad, or kale chips!

These will keep for a couple of weeks in your fridge crisper drawer:
Leeks—keep whole or chop for soup and freeze (no need to blanche)

These will keep for many weeks in cold storage (keep moist in bag, with some ventilation):
Carrots – 5#,
Potatoes – 4#,
Beets – 2#,
Kohlrabi—peel and slice or grate as an excellent salad or stirfry ingredient
Cabbage—if you are making sauerkraut or kimchi, do that asap
Celeriac–mildly celery flavored root great for mashing with potatoes, roasting, or for soups and stews.  Peel and cut up.
Gilfeather Turnips

Black Radish
Parsnips

These will keep for many weeks in cool, dry conditions (40-55 degrees), like a shelf in your basement or unheated room as long as it doesn’t freeze:
Garlic ½ #(can also be stored in a tightly closed jar in the refrigerator)
Butternut Squash–can store in your kitchen for a few weeks, cooler temps with ventilation for longer (not in a plastic bag), store in single layers/separate, not in pile.  Any with blemishes should be used right away or peel, chop and freeze.

These will keep for months at 50-70 degrees—NOT COLD STORAGE:
Sweet potatoes 3 #’s–store in a paper bag.

These will keep for a year or more in dry conditions (closed jar), not too warm:
Dried beans 2# –your choice of black turtle, light red kidney, or Great Northern (all organically grown)

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